Collection: PART ONE

Tactile Structures

Description

Exploring tactile surfaces found in the modern man made environment. A very geometric approach to mark making.

In medicine, the term "touch" is usually replaced with "somatic senses" to describe the variety of senses involved. Althoughtouch (also called tactile perception) is considered one of the five traditional senses, the impression of touch is formed from several sensations including pressure, skin stretch, vibration and temperature. The somatosensory system is a complex sensory system. It is made up of a number of different receptors, includingthermoreceptors, photoreceptors, mechanoreceptors and chemoreceptors. It also comprises essential processing centres, orsensory modalities, such as proprioception, mechanoreception (touch), thermoception (temperature), and nociception (pain). The sensory receptors cover the skin and epithelial tissues, skeletal muscles, bones and joints, internal organs, and thecardiovascular system. Somatic senses are sometimes referred to as somesthetic senses, with the understanding that somesthesis includes touch, proprioception and (depending on usage) also haptic perception. Processing primarily occurs in the primary somatosensory area in the parietal lobe of the cerebral cortex: information is sent from the receptors via sensory nerves, through tracts in the spinal cord and finally into the brain.The system works when activity in a sensory neuron is triggered by a specific stimulus such as pain, for instance. This signal then passes to the part of the brain attributed to that area on the body—this allows the stimulus to be felt at the correct location. The mapping of the body surfaces in the brain is called a homunculus and plays a fundamental role in the creation of body image. This brain-surface ("cortical") map is not immutable, however. Dramatic shifts can occur in response to stroke or injury.

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This can get complicated so here are the basics. Brutalism is a post-war architectural style defined by the use of simple block-like forms usually made from cast concrete or brick. It is characterised by ‘Massive’ heavily-textured raw concrete (beton brut) angular geometric shapes. Brutalism thrived between the mid-1950s and 1970s.

According to RIBA, here is what to look for in a Brutalist building:

1. Rough unfinished surfaces
2. Unusual shapes
3. Heavy-looking materials
4. Massive forms
5. Small windows in relation to the other parts

Brutalism, or New Brutalism as it was sometimes referred to, has its roots in modernism but emerged as a movement against the architectural mainstream with its emphasis on materials, textures and construction as well as functionality and equality. The brutalist architects challenged traditional notions of what a building should look like, focussing on interior spaces as much as exterior. They also showed the building’s construction, unafraid to make a feature of service towers, plumbing and ventilation ducts in their creations.

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Process

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Final Outcome

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Bibliography Referencing

http://londonist.com

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Cutting Edges:Contemporary Collage

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The new heyday of collage in current art, illustration, and design.
Editors: R. Klanten, H. Hellige, J. Gallagher
Release Date: February 2011
Format: 24 x 30 cm
Features: 224 pages, full color, hardcover
Language: English
 
Collage has an outstanding tradition in the modern visual arts. Influenced by surrealism and Dada as well as constructivism, the technique was firmly established as an art form in the 1920s and 1930s through the work of artists such as John Heartfield, El Lissitzky, and Hannah Höch. Today, a new generation of young artists and illustrators is rediscovering collage.
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Urban Interventions:Personal Projects in Public Places

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The first book to document the next quantum leap in artistic work now hitting public spaces.
Editors: R. Klanten, M. Huebner
Release Date: March 2010
Format: 24 x 30 cm
Features: 288 Pages, full color, hardcover
Language: English
 
Evolving from graffiti and street art, urban interventions are the next generation of artwork to hit public space. Using any and all of the components that make up urban and rural landscapes, these mostly spatial interventions bring art to the masses. They turn the street into a studio, laboratory, club, and gallery. Modified traffic signs, swings at bus stops, and images created out of sand or snow challenge us to rediscover our environment and interact with it in new ways. The work is an intelligent and critical commentary on the planning, use, and commercialization of public space.
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Own Referencing

Brunswick Centre

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It was designed by Patrick Hodgkinson in the mid-1960s, based on studies by Leslie Martin. It was initially planned as a private development at a time when private, mixed-use development in the UK was rare. Building started in 1967 and was completed in 1972, though the building fell some way short of its intended size. The original plan extended up to Euston Road but the Ministry of Defence would not release the site of a building they leased for use by the Territorial Army (and that still stands next to the Centre today).

Despite being widely disliked by those who are unsympathetic to modernist architecture, it achieved Grade II status in 2000. By this time, however, many of its shop premises were unoccupied. Plans for renovation had repeatedly been blocked by residents' committees but in November 2002, the £22 million project began. This included the painting of the blocks in their originally-planned colour and the commissioning of artist Susanna Heron to introduce water features to the central space.The major work was completed in late 2006 with the opening of branches of several high street chain stores and restaurants. The dual management has caused problems though, as the landlord restored the structure of the estate but the council is responsible for maintenance of the residential properties - so while the concrete structure was restored, the windows remained untouched, detracting from the overall aesthetic of the development. In 2007, the council started work on replacing the windows that has resulted in the residents having scaffolding outside their flats for the second time in just a few years.

 

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Southbank

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